Category: USN

Southeast Asia: Building the Navy’s Bases

Southeast Asia: Building the Navy’s Bases:

This is the link to the entirety of the 400+ page book Southeast Asia: Building the Navy’s Bases by Richard Tregaskis. 

USS Sanctuary, US Navy hospital ship, date unknown

USS Sanctuary, US Navy hospital ship, date unknown

From the source: “Swift boats at the [USS Benewah].”

From the source: “Swift boats at the [USS Benewah].”

bullit-1987:PBR surfing ..  [Source: John Phillips]

bullit-1987:

PBR surfing .. 

[Source: John Phillips]

From the source:American servicemen initially traveled to…

From the source:

American servicemen initially traveled to Vietnam aboard World War II-era troopships like the General Nelson M. Walker. Nearly 5,000 Marines and G.I.s crowded the Walker on each three-week voyage from Oakland, Calif., to Danang or Qui Nhon, South Vietnam. Credit: Art and Lee Beltrone, Vietnam Graffiti Project, Keswick, Va.

Fueling a McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II of US Navy Strike…

Fueling a McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II of US Navy Strike Fighter Squadron (VF) 161 off the USS Midway, circa 1972.

From the source:Mineman Second Class Franklin Marshall, a Navy…

From the source:

Mineman Second Class Franklin Marshall, a Navy Explosive Ordnance Disposal Team member, conducts a search for mines, especially those attached to ship’s hulls, circa April 1966. The E.O.D. Team is responsible for harbor security. Several merchant ships are in the distance. Photographed by Ernie Filtz. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the U.S. National Archives.

From the source:May 17, 1967: A U.S. Marine corpsman leads a…

From the source:

May 17, 1967: A U.S. Marine corpsman leads a wounded comrade, foreground, as others carry bodies toward a helicopter in Con Thien, Vietnam. [AP]

“As Jim [Spahr, Office of Naval Intelligence] learned his job better, he was astounded at the variety…”

“As Jim [Spahr, Office of Naval Intelligence] learned his job better, he was astounded at the variety of intelligence gathered on homosexuals by the police and government. The FBI followed people to gay bars, checked license numbers of cars parked outside, and followed people home to see with whom they had made an assignation. The San Francisco police, like police in may other cities, freely shared with the FBI and military police files of men and women they arrested in raids on gay bars, so that everyone had up-to-date lists of deviates.”

Conduct Unbecoming: Gays & Lesbians in the U.S. Military by Randy Shilts, page 51.

See this quote for more information on Jim Spahr’s job with the Office of Naval Intelligence.

“The need for men and supplies for Vietnam overwhelmed the services’ ability to fly and ship…”

“The need for men and supplies for Vietnam overwhelmed the services’ ability to fly and ship them, particularly in the early years of the buildup. This made plenty of work for private ships working in the Military Sea Transportation Service, the merchant marine. When their ships were required for secret missions, their civilian crews needed security clearances. In San Francisco at Fort Mason, it was the job of Lieutenant (junior grade) Jim Spahr to do the footwork for the Office of Naval Intelligence and conduct the necessary background checks.
         Usually, this meant little more than looking in to the crews’ police records. Barring some serious crime, approval was routine. IT was while looking into such records, however, that Spahr began running across police accounts of individuals who had been observed at a ‘known homosexual gathering place.’ Under regulations, this meant the crewman could not be cleared for work: He might be queer and a security risk. To keep the government’s business, the shipping company must fire the crewman.”

Conduct Unbecoming: Gays & Lesbians in the U.S. Military by Randy Shilts, page 49.