Category: self reblog

vietnamwarera:Vietnam Veterans Against the War


Demo in Washington, DC, late 1960s


Miami Republican Convention, 1972


Anti-war march, NYC, early 1970s


Anti-war march, Times Square, NYC, 1972


Veterans Day march, NYC, 1975


Veterans Day, Chicago, 1977

vietnamwarera:

Vietnam Veterans Against the War

vietnamwarera:“Navy Nurse Corps Vietnam Veterans” parade through…

vietnamwarera:

“Navy Nurse Corps Vietnam Veterans” parade through Fredricksburg, VA.

vietnamwarera: This Veterans Day take the time to remember not…

vietnamwarera:

This Veterans Day take the time to remember not only the men and women who volunteered to serve, but those who were drafted.

Remember not only the men and women who served on the front lines, but those that served in the relative safety of the rear.

Remember not only the men and women are proud of their service, but those who would rather forget it. Remember not only the men and women who served during peacetime, but those who served during wartime. 

Thank you, veterans, for your service.

[AP Photo/Matt Rourke]

vietnamwarera:Veteran reunions, various units, from 2003-2015….


1st Bn, 5th Marines, 1st Marine Division, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 2007 Reunion


70th Engineer Battalion, 2010 Reunion


92nd Assault Helicopter Company, Manitou Springs, Colorado, 2011 Reunion


Delta Co, 2nd Bn, 8th Cav, 1st Cav Reg, 2012 Denver, Colorado Reunion


77th Field Artillery Regiment, Fernandina Beach, Florida, 2012 Reunion


Tan Son Nhut Association, Chattanooga, Tennessee, 2013 Reunion


Delta Co 1/26 Marines, Charleston, South Carolina, 2003 Reunion


Delta Co, 6/31st Infantry Regiment, 2015 Reunion

vietnamwarera:

Veteran reunions, various units, from 2003-2015. Click each individual photo for a caption containing unit, location, and year.

vietnamwarera: vietnamwarera: Hey folks! I’m still around. Rough draft for my senior thesis is due…

vietnamwarera:

vietnamwarera:

Hey folks!

I’m still around. Rough draft for my senior thesis is due in a couple weeks. Add to that a much needed weekend trip, and a cold, I haven’t gotten anything done here.

Bear with me just a little longer (the semester ends in about 6 weeks) and I’ll be around getting original posts up!

I hope everyone is doing well!

Forgot to mention yesterday but I’ve been a bit more active over on Twitter. Come say hi!

Transgender Air Force Veteran Tells Her Story – Transgender American Veterans Association

Transgender Air Force Veteran Tells Her Story – Transgender American Veterans Association:

vietnamwarera:

So, why did Joanne join the Air Force rather than another service?  For someone who grew up amidst the farms of the Midwest, it was simple; she didn’t want to get dirty or wet.  It also seemed the safest.  Well, perhaps, but she spent the Vietnam War deployed in the remote hinterlands of South East Asia that were crawling with Viet Cong infiltrators, earning every one of those medals.

She called the ‘safety thing’ “a lullaby.”  But still, she stayed on out of patriotism, and the economics of being married, twice.  Just as important, for Joanne, was the camaraderie of service friends, that is different from anywhere else.  Even though she kept her secret from them, the depth of such friendships were deeply meaningful for her.

The ability of transgender service members to serve effectively in the military is still debated today, though without much evidence on the part of those trying to deny transgender people from serving openly in the military. A look at history will show that many transgender individuals have served in the United States armed forces, and have done so with honor and distinction. Joanne Carroll is one such veteran.

Despite the contributions of transgender people in the United States military, which the Trump administration and conservatives at large claim to hold so dearly, the administration is currently looking to redefine sex and gender to deny rights and services to trans people.

Joanne’s service, and the service of other trans veterans, is being disgraced. This is unacceptable.  

“As Jim [Spahr, Office of Naval Intelligence] learned his job better, he was astounded at the variety…”

“As Jim [Spahr, Office of Naval Intelligence] learned his job better, he was astounded at the variety of intelligence gathered on homosexuals by the police and government. The FBI followed people to gay bars, checked license numbers of cars parked outside, and followed people home to see with whom they had made an assignation. The San Francisco police, like police in may other cities, freely shared with the FBI and military police files of men and women they arrested in raids on gay bars, so that everyone had up-to-date lists of deviates.”

Conduct Unbecoming: Gays & Lesbians in the U.S. Military by Randy Shilts, page 51.

See this quote for more information on Jim Spahr’s job with the Office of Naval Intelligence.

(via vietnamwarera)

Army Strong: A gay soldier’s life of service

Army Strong: A gay soldier’s life of service:

vietnamwarera:

During his career, he served as a platoon leader and a company executive officer in Vietnam. He received two Bronze Stars, one for valor, a Purple Heart and an Air Medal. He was chief of military education for the Army Reserve in St. Louis and an inspector general in California. His final assignment was as an engineer war plans officer at Fort Hood, Texas. After a fire at his home there in 1996, an arson investigation uncovered video that indicated Loomis is gay.

More than 14,000 service members have been discharged in 16 years under Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell. “That’s enough to form an entire Army infantry division,” Loomis points out.

His case went to Federal Court, and he won by arguing the Army did not follow its own regulations and discharge procedures. “The judge was looking for the easiest way to decide the case,” he says. Nine years after he was kicked out of the military, Loomis got his retirement. He returned home to New Mexico and joined the state’s chapter of American Veterans for Equal Rights, of which he is now president. Last year, members marched in the Albuquerque Veterans Day parade for the first time.

“The need for men and supplies for Vietnam overwhelmed the services’ ability to fly and ship them,…”

“The need for men and supplies for Vietnam overwhelmed the services’ ability to fly and ship them, particularly in the early years of the buildup. This made plenty of work for private ships working in the Military Sea Transportation Service, the merchant marine. When their ships were required for secret missions, their civilian crews needed security clearances. In San Francisco at Fort Mason, it was the job of Lieutenant (junior grade) Jim Spahr to do the footwork for the Office of Naval Intelligence and conduct the necessary background checks.
         Usually, this meant little more than looking in to the crews’ police records. Barring some serious crime, approval was routine. IT was while looking into such records, however, that Spahr began running across police accounts of individuals who had been observed at a ‘known homosexual gathering place.’ Under regulations, this meant the crewman could not be cleared for work: He might be queer and a security risk. To keep the government’s business, the shipping company must fire the crewman.”

Conduct Unbecoming: Gays & Lesbians in the U.S. Military by Randy Shilts, page 49.
(via vietnamwarera)

“Life was much tougher at the front lines, because the field offered so few opportunities for privacy…”

“Life was much tougher at the front lines, because the field offered so few opportunities for privacy and because the soldiers at the front tended to be younger and less confident in skirting the rules. The Vietnam experience was far less libidinous for the typical gay soldier than was later fantasized in homophile fiction and erotic filmmaking.
       Danny Flaherty, for instance, had only one homosexual experience in Vietnam, with his first sergeant’s effeminate driver in the back of a truck. There was, however, a near encounter a few months later, as Danny was smoking pot with a heterosexual sergeant. As Danny took a deep drag of marijuana, he saw that his friend had opened his zipper and was glancing toward him. Danny was extremely stoned; it took a moment to appreciate what was going on. It was a moment too long. The next thing he knew, the zipper was closed. The two of them continued smoking and joking, and neither of them acknowledged that anything out of the ordinary had happened.”

Conduct Unbecoming: Gays & Lesbians in the U.S. Military by Randy Shilts, page 43.

See this quote for what life was like in rear areas of Vietnam.

(via vietnamwarera)