Category: National Archives

Remembering Vietnam: Live reactions and thoughts

Remembering Vietnam: Live reactions and thoughts:

Join me on Twitter as I walk through the National Archives exhibit “Remembering Vietnam.”

vietnamwarera: Today I have the opportunity to visit the “Remembering Vietnam” exhibit at the…

vietnamwarera:

Today I have the opportunity to visit the “Remembering Vietnam” exhibit at the National Archives in Washington, DC. I’m very much looking forward to this opportunity and plan to jot down my thoughts along the way to share with you all here. 

I am also incredibly lucky that there is to be a panel tomorrow evening about the Tet Offensive that I will be attending. (More info here) For those not in the area, the National Archives will be streaming the panel live on their YouTube channel. The centerpiece of the panel is Dr Erik B. Villard and his book Combat Operations: Staying the Course, October 1967-September 1968. This is the latest installment of the US Army in Vietnam series and can be read online for free here: https://history.army.mil/catalog/pubs/91/91-15.html.

I hope everyone is doing well and I apologize for my lack of presence here. I’m here as I’m able and I appreciate the continued support!

Reminder that this will be streamed live on YouTube in about 30 minutes!

Today I have the opportunity to visit the “Remembering Vietnam” exhibit at the National Archives in…

Today I have the opportunity to visit the “Remembering Vietnam” exhibit at the National Archives in Washington, DC. I’m very much looking forward to this opportunity and plan to jot down my thoughts along the way to share with you all here. 

I am also incredibly lucky that there is to be a panel tomorrow evening about the Tet Offensive that I will be attending. (More info here) For those not in the area, the National Archives will be streaming the panel live on their YouTube channel. The centerpiece of the panel is Dr Erik B. Villard and his book Combat Operations: Staying the Course, October 1967-September 1968. This is the latest installment of the US Army in Vietnam series and can be read online for free here: https://history.army.mil/catalog/pubs/91/91-15.html.

I hope everyone is doing well and I apologize for my lack of presence here. I’m here as I’m able and I appreciate the continued support!

usnatarchivesexhibits: “Confront the Warmakers,”…

usnatarchivesexhibits:

“Confront the Warmakers,” 1968

Written on behalf of the National Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, this letter urged people to gather for a group protest in Chicago’s Grant Park on the afternoon of August 28. This urging came following days of violence in Chicago as police tasked with safeguarding the ongoing Democratic National Convention clashed with anti-war demonstrators. The letter insists that people should not stay away from the scene despite the violence, but stand firm and maintain their First Amendment rights.

Letter from National Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam

Learn more about “Remembering Vietnam.”

getoutofthisplace: Dear Gus, Our veterans group met with Alice…

getoutofthisplace:

Dear Gus,

Our veterans group met with Alice Kamps at the National Archives this morning. She curated a new exhibit here about the Vietnam War and she let us in the building before it was open to the public so that we might have plenty of time to see everything we wanted to. 

The thing that got me the most today was a handwritten letter from a mother to President Lyndon Johnson. She references a previous letter she and her husband wrote to him, opposing the war and the reasons her son was drafted, and then in this letter, she tells the president that her son has died in the war. Johnson’s reply was also on display. It was typewritten, but had lots and lots of handwritten edits–clear indication to me that he couldn’t develop a good explanation for the death. It’s talked about in this video at the 21:00 mark.

Every person that dies in war, is a real person, and you must never forget that when you have conversations about the use of force around the world.

Dad

Washington, D.C. 12.2.2017 – 9.59am.

The National Archives exhibit is called “Remembering Vietnam.” It opened Nov 10, 2017 and will be open until Jan 6, 2019 in Washington, DC.

aotus: Remembering Vietnam The National Archives opened our…


Remembering Vietnam Exhibit. Photo by Jeff Reed


Helicopters are moved off of transport trucks onto the lawn of the National Archives in preparation for the opening weekend of the new exhibit Remembering Vietnam. Photo By Jeff Reed

aotus:

Remembering Vietnam

The National Archives opened our newest exhibition, Remembering Vietnam: Twelve Critical Episodes in the Vietnam War on November 10, 2017. The exhibit examines 12 critical episodes in the Vietnam War to provide a framework for understanding the decisions that led to war, events and consequences of the war, and its legacy. This 3,000-square-foot exhibit uses more than 80 original records from the National Archives – including newly declassified documents – to critically reexamine major events and turning points in the war and address three critical questions about the Vietnam War: Why did the United States get involved? Why did the war last so long? Why was it so controversial?

More than 50 years after the United States committed combat troops to the war in Vietnam, and more than 40 years since the war ended, the complexity of the conflict is still being unraveled. Historians continue to make discoveries in National Archives’ records that provide insight into this critical period.

Read the full post on the AOTUS blog.

Photos by National Archives photographer, Jeff Reed.