Category: Cold War

todaysdocument: “Operation ‘Rang Dong.’ A column of UH-1D…

todaysdocument:

Operation ‘Rang Dong.’ A column of UH-1D helicopters prepare to disembark members of Co “C”, 3rd Bn’s, 7th Inf, 199th Light Inf Bde, for a combat assault.” 11/22/1967

File Unit: Vietnam – Aviation-Helicopters-UH-1D [Huey], 1963 – 1973Series: Photographs of U.S. Army Operations in Vietnam, 1963 – 1973Record Group 111: Records of the Office of the Chief Signal Officer, 1860 – 1985


Now open at the National Archives Museum:
Remembering Vietnam: Twelve Critical Episodes in the Vietnam War

Explore 12 critical episodes in the Vietnam War through National Archives records which trace the policies and decisions made by the architects of the conflict and help untangle why the United States became involved in Vietnam, why it went on so long, and why it was so divisive for American society.

Find more records, information, and resources on the Vietnam War from the @usnatarchives at the Vietnam War Research Portal.

todaysdocument: “A Marine machine gun crew from Co. E, 2nd…

todaysdocument:

“A Marine machine gun crew from Co. E, 2nd Bn., 5th Marines, is in place on Hill 170 during Operation Essex. They are, left to right: Pfc. J.L. Duckworth, Cpl. H.T. Hudson and Pfc. D.O. McPherson.” 11/20/1967

Series: General Photograph File of the U.S. Marine Corps, 1927 – 1981Record Group 127: Records of the U.S. Marine Corps, 1775 –


Now open at the National Archives Museum:
Remembering Vietnam: Twelve Critical Episodes in the Vietnam War

Explore 12 critical episodes in the Vietnam War through National Archives records which trace the policies and decisions made by the architects of the conflict and help untangle why the United States became involved in Vietnam, why it went on so long, and why it was so divisive for American society.

Find more records, information, and resources on the Vietnam War from the @usnatarchives at the Vietnam War Research Portal.

uss-edsall: July 26, 1968. Two 1st Cavalry Division LRP teams,…

uss-edsall:

July 26, 1968. Two 1st Cavalry Division LRP teams, Quang Tri, Vietnam.

aotus: Remembering Vietnam The National Archives opened our…


Remembering Vietnam Exhibit. Photo by Jeff Reed


Helicopters are moved off of transport trucks onto the lawn of the National Archives in preparation for the opening weekend of the new exhibit Remembering Vietnam. Photo By Jeff Reed

aotus:

Remembering Vietnam

The National Archives opened our newest exhibition, Remembering Vietnam: Twelve Critical Episodes in the Vietnam War on November 10, 2017. The exhibit examines 12 critical episodes in the Vietnam War to provide a framework for understanding the decisions that led to war, events and consequences of the war, and its legacy. This 3,000-square-foot exhibit uses more than 80 original records from the National Archives – including newly declassified documents – to critically reexamine major events and turning points in the war and address three critical questions about the Vietnam War: Why did the United States get involved? Why did the war last so long? Why was it so controversial?

More than 50 years after the United States committed combat troops to the war in Vietnam, and more than 40 years since the war ended, the complexity of the conflict is still being unraveled. Historians continue to make discoveries in National Archives’ records that provide insight into this critical period.

Read the full post on the AOTUS blog.

Photos by National Archives photographer, Jeff Reed.

therustyskull:Happy birthday Marines! My pop circa 1967 at Khe…

therustyskull:

Happy birthday Marines! My pop circa 1967 at Khe Sanh Combat Base, Vietnam.

todaysdocument: “Staff Sergeant Hugh L. Maple Playing with a…

todaysdocument:

“Staff Sergeant Hugh L. Maple Playing with a Vietnamese Child , 11/10/1967″

Series: Color Photographs of Signal Corps Activity, 1944 – 1981Record Group 111: Records of the Office of the Chief Signal Officer, 1860 – 1985


Opening today, November 10, at the National Archives Museum:
Remembering Vietnam: Twelve Critical Episodes in the Vietnam War

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This exhibition presents both iconic and recently discovered National Archives records related to 12 critical episodes in the Vietnam War. They trace the policies and decisions made by the architects of the conflict and help untangle why the United States became involved in Vietnam, why it went on so long, and why it was so divisive for American society.

Honor Flight brings vets to “Remembering Vietnam” at National Archives

usnatarchives:

image

Edward C. Brandol, a Vietnam Veteran, talks with Curator, Alice Kamps, during the public opening of the National Archives’ “Remembering Vietnam” exhibit. Brandol and a large group of Vietnam Veterans hosted by Utah Honor Flight travelled to Washington, DC to be the first group of its kind to see the exhibit. 

“Remembering Vietnam” explores 12 critical episodes in the Vietnam War. It seeks to answer questions about this period in American history such as “Why did the U.S. become involved in Vietnam?”, “Why was the war so long?”, and “Why was it so controversial?”

It is important to answer these questions. The sacrifices made by veterans and their families, the magnitude of death and destruction, and the war’s lasting effects require no less. 

“Remembering Vietnam” is a resource for refreshing our collective memory. Iconic and recently discovered National Archives records trace the policies and decisions made by the architects of the conflict. Its collection of evidence provides an opportunity for new insight and greater understanding of one of the most consequential wars in American History. 

“Remembering Vietnam,” which opened today, will be on exhibit until January 9, 2019.

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Today marks the opening of the National Archives’ new exhibit, “Remembering Vietnam.” Archivist of the United States David S. Ferriero, a Vietnam veteran himself, was a driving force behind the exhibit. In this photo, HM2 Ferriero stands outside his bunker at First Medical Battalion, Danang, Vietnam, 1970.

Keep reading

Thank you, veterans.

Of all service branches, who served during times of war or peace. 

Take some time to browse through the tags #Veteran’s Day and #veterans here.

Always post this on the Marine Corps Birthday :) My dad in the…

Always post this on the Marine Corps Birthday 🙂 My dad in the Corps working dogs.

They were the first dog platoon to arrive in Vietnam. This was also the fist time dogs had been used since WW2. Here he is near Danang, Sept 1965, 3rd Marine Div, 1st Provisional Dog Platoon.

Caption from usmc.mil site:

3rdMarDiv
Vietnam
STOP HIM- -Cpl Herman J. Herden (San Antonio, TX) commands his sentry dog “Rex” to the attack as Air Force TSgt William Sorrells plays the “enemy” in a practice session at the 1st Marine Provisional Dog Platoon site near Danang.

This was in Leatherneck Magazine also.

Submitted by the child of a veteran.

#RememberingVietnam: Mementos

fordlibrarymuseum:

In honor of the opening of the National Archives exhibit “Remembering Vietnam” on
Friday, November 10, this week we’ll be featuring content from our
collections related to the people who experienced the conflict in
Vietnam. Learn more about the #RememberingVietnam campaign and how to
participate here.

View of the staircase from the American Embassy in Saigon on display at the Ford Museum, via Google Streetview

During the hectic and turbulent hours before North Vietnamese forces swept into Saigon at the end of April 1975, American personnel and Vietnamese allies climbed to the rooftops of buildings to be evacuated by helicopter. One of the staircases used during the evacuation, this one taken from the top of

the building that served as the American Embassy in Saigon from the 1960s to 1975, is part of the collections at the Ford
Presidential Museum.

President Ford reflected on the final evacuation and the meaning of this “important, if sobering, piece of 20th century history”

during his remarks at the opening of the Ford Museum’s Saigon Staircase Exhibit on April 10, 1999:

April 1975 was indeed the cruelest month. […]

The passage of time has not dulled the ache of
those days, the saddest of my public life. I pray that no future
American president is ever faced with the grim options that confronted
me as the military situation on the ground deteriorated… mediating
between those who wanted an early exit and others who would go down with
all flags flying… running a desperate race against the clock to
rescue as many people as we could before enemy shelling destroyed
airport runways… followed by the heartbreaking realization that, as
refugees streamed out onto those runways, we were left with only one
alternative – a final evacuation by helicopter from the roof of the U.S.
Embassy. […]

A quarter century after
Operation Frequent Wind concluded, I still grieve over those we were
unable to rescue. I still mourn for 2500 American soldiers who to this
day remain unaccounted for. Yet the passage of time brings with it a
fresh perspective. No doubt each visitor will interpret this staircase
and its historical significance for himself. For many, it was both a way
out of a nightmare – and a doorway into something incomparably better.
To some it will always be seen as an emblem of military defeat.

For me, however, it is a monument of hope and not despair. For it symbolizes man’s undying desire to be free.