Category: Cold War

MCDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II of US Navy Strike Fighter…

MCDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II of US Navy Strike Fighter Squadron (VF) 161 off the USS Midway, circa 1972.

From the source, Bob Coveney: “On the wall above my bed at Lane…

From the source, Bob Coveney: “On the wall above my bed at Lane Army Heliport. I still have both of these, the wings were from my time with the 203rd RAC while flying O-1G Birdogs. 1971″

Alpha Company, 2/8th Cavalry, circa 1965

Alpha Company, 2/8th Cavalry, circa 1965

usnatarchivesexhibits: Airborne: Lobo, 1968 Does your dog…

usnatarchivesexhibits:

Airborne: Lobo, 1968

Does your dog enjoy the breeze blowing in his face during a car ride? Maybe he would enjoy parachute jumping as Lobo here did. The pup almost appears to be grinning after finishing his first parachute jump with his handler, Sergeant Frank Spano.

Animals (war dogs, mascots, pets) – 1968

Learn more about “Remembering Vietnam.”

From the source:Vietnamese Marines Fight Communist Infiltrators…

From the source:

Vietnamese Marines Fight Communist Infiltrators in Gia Dinh – A Vietnamese tanker fires his 50 Caliber machine gun into a Viet Cong position in Gia Dinh during heavy street fighting June 4. Viet Cong infiltrators had dug in along a wall in a yard and had to be blasted out.

Bell UH-1 Huey at work, 1970

Bell UH-1 Huey at work, 1970

Radio telephone operator, 6th Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment,…

Radio telephone operator, 6th Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 1970.

Dog handler of the 1st Infantry Division, circa 1966.

Dog handler of the 1st Infantry Division, circa 1966.

Marine of HQ Company, 9th Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division,…

Marine of HQ Company, 9th Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division, circa 1965

“The minigun ships, on the other hand, carried fourteen rockets, and two, 7.62mm, six-barrel minigun,…”

“The minigun ships, on the other hand, carried fourteen rockets, and two, 7.62mm, six-barrel minigun, machine guns. These are truly awesome weapons. The machine guns were electrically operated from a sighting system in the copilot seat. The aircraft commander (AC) could, however, take control of these guns if he deemed fit. An electronic, piper or bullseye was in the sights and the copilot moved this piper to line up on his target. The sights came down on a mechanical arm from their stowed position when the copilot released them. As he moved the piper, the guns followed. We generally set these guns to fire at a rate of 2,400 rounds per minute. That meant the ship could put out 80 rounds per second. These guns had a maximum capability of firing 6,000 rounds per minute but that rate was reserved for the faster fixed wing fighter jets. At our fire rate of 2,400 rounds per minute at the speed of 120 knots, a good operator could put a bullet in every square foot on the ground. You don’t need any more coverage than that. More would waste ammunition and decrease your available time at a combat station. Try to imagine what it would sound like if you were to make the single blast of a 308 high powered rifle a continuous sound. Let me tell you, it is a deafening roar when the miniguns kick in. They get hot quickly, so they are set up to fire no more than three second bursts, and then automatically kick off for three seconds, to keep the barrels from melting down.”

Guts ‘N Gunships: What it was Really Like to Fly Combat Helicopters in Vietnam by Mark Garrison, page 114