Category: anti war

todaysdocument: Photos from a Draft Resistance Rally at the Town…


Man Burning Draft Card at Draft Resistance Rally


Noam Chomsky Speaking at Draft Resistance Rally


Allen Ginsberg Signing Petition at Draft Resistance Rally, 1/14/1968


Anti-Draft Petition

todaysdocument:

Photos from a Draft Resistance Rally at the Town Hall, New York City, 1/14/1968

[Photographs] Town Hall Meeting, 1/14/1968, Draft Resistance Rally [Town Hall, New York City] . 
Series: Precedent Case Files, 1928 – 1976Record Group 118: Records of U.S. Attorneys, 1821 – 1994

This file unit contains photographs depicting a Draft Resistance Rally held at Town Hall in New York City. The rally was a demonstration of support for “The Boston Five,” William Sloane Coffin, Jr., Michael Ferber, Mitchell Goodman, Marcus Raskin and Benjamin Spock, who were indicted in U.S. District Court for the District of Massachusetts for aiding and abetting draft resistance.


Now open at the National Archives Museum:
Remembering Vietnam: Twelve Critical Episodes in the Vietnam War

image

Explore 12 critical episodes in the Vietnam War through National Archives records which trace the policies and decisions made by the architects of the conflict and help untangle why the United States became involved in Vietnam, why it went on so long, and why it was so divisive for American society.

Find more records, information, and resources on the Vietnam War from the @usnatarchives at the Vietnam War Research Portal.

historium:“Withdraw U.S. Troops Now! End Canada’s Complicity in…

historium:

“Withdraw U.S. Troops Now! End Canada’s Complicity in Vietnam: Easter March for Peace” poster, circa 1969 for the Vietnam Mobilization Committee

Source

This Canadian poster’s depiction of Uncle Sam as a skull with an American Flag hat can be seen again in a poster from New Zealand calling for a march in 1970.

uss-edsall: Sailors from the HMNZS Taranaki in the foreground,…

uss-edsall:

Sailors from the HMNZS Taranaki in the foreground, with police and anti Vietnam war protesters, at the opening of Parliament in Wellington, in 1969. The demonstrators hold signs, and banners, asking for the withdrawal of United States and New Zealand troops from Vietnam. Photograph taken for the Evening Post newspaper by an unidentified photographer.

Norman Mailer and the Anti-War Movement during the Vietnam War

phillyarchives:

The document featured here is the Judgment
and Commitment form for defendant Norman Mailer who was arrested on October 22,
1967 for disorderly conduct for failing to leave the Pentagon after the
designated time when the protest against America’s involvement in the Vietnam
War was scheduled to end.

Today, October 21, 2017, marks the 50th
anniversary of the famous anti-war protest march on the Pentagon during the
height of the Vietnam War. The march on the Pentagon represented a major
escalation in the anti-war movement against America’s involvement in the
Vietnam War. The march was the first of many such protests that grew larger and
(sometimes) bloodier in the months and years that followed.

Renowned author Norman Mailer took part in
the march on the Pentagon and was arrested along 650 other protesters. Mailer
was tried before the U.S. District Court in Alexandria, Virginia; and, as the featured
document clearly states, Norman Mailer pled no contest to the charges and was
fined $500 and given a 30 day prison sentence (of which 25 days were to be
suspended) and requiring Mailer to serve five days imprisonment. Mailer
appealed the conviction to the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals and, finally, to
the U.S. Supreme Court. Both courts upheld the conviction and, as page two of
the document shows, Norman Mailer eventually served two days in jail and was
released on May 7, 1970. Mailer would later write the book The Armies of the Night recounting the events of the march and his
arrest.

Norman Mailer was born in 1923 in Northern
New Jersey and was raised in Brooklyn, NY. Mailer served in the U.S. Army and
was stationed overseas in the Philippines during World War Two. After the war Norman
Mailer published the novel The Naked and
the Dead
which remains a critically acclaimed novel. For the remainder of
his life Mailer was a renowned prolific author of fiction and non-fiction, an essayist,
social commentator, and a political and social activist. He died on November
10, 2007.

Interested to learn more
about our holdings? You can check out our online catalog at: archives.gov/research/catalog/ and
make an appointment to view our holdings at the National Archives at
Philadelphia by calling (215) 305-2044 or emailing us at philadelphia.archives@nara.gov.

Today’s post was written by Matthew DiBiase,
Archives Specialist at the National Archives at Philadelphia.

Citation: Judgment and Commitment Form
from Criminal Case File 4591, Criminal Case Files, 1872-1996, Box 166, Record
Group 21: Records of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of
Virginia-Alexandria Division, National Archives at Philadelphia, (Record Entry
ID: PH-964) (NAID Identifier 571616).

todaysdocument: Draft Resistance Rally at the Department of…

todaysdocument:

Draft Resistance Rally at the Department of Justice, 10/20/1967

File Unit: Photographs Taken by SA [Special Agent] Hilmer H. Krebs, 1928 – 1976Series: Precedent Case Files, 1928 – 1976Record Group 118: Records of U.S. Attorneys, 1821 – 1994


Opening November 10 at the National Archives Museum:

Remembering Vietnam: Twelve Critical Episodes in the Vietnam War

image

This exhibition presents both iconic and recently discovered National Archives records related to 12 critical episodes in the Vietnam War. They trace the policies and decisions made by the architects of the conflict and help untangle why the United States became involved in Vietnam, why it went on so long, and why it was so divisive for American society.