Category: 1971

From the source: “Combat tracker dog and its handler LZ Action…

From the source: “Combat tracker dog and its handler LZ Action 1971″

“’Zig Zag Men’ M48 tank of 1/10 Cavalry LZ Action 1971″ [Source]

“’Zig Zag Men’ M48 tank of 1/10 Cavalry LZ Action 1971″ [Source]

Australian soldier with ARVN soldiers, 1971.

Australian soldier with ARVN soldiers, 1971.

uss-edsall: The book of my father’s side of the family history…

uss-edsall:

The book of my father’s side of the family history was written by Major Joel Levin, and detailed the history of the Levins from one orphan in Ukraine in the late 1800s to 1999. Joel goes to great lengths to describe the WWII service of my extended family, but his only words for himself are:
“I personally served in Viet Nam in 1970 and 1971 and saw combat at Khe Sanh, Phan Thiet and also outside Cam Ranh Bay at Bac Cum Mountain. I received the Viet Nam service ribbon and the Bronze Star.”
That is all he had to say about that.

American airmen in front of Royal Lao Air Force North American…

American airmen in front of Royal Lao Air Force North American T-28 Trojans at Udorn Royal Thair Air Force Base, circa 1971-1972. Submitted by a veteran.

“By the time Air Force Captain Bill Oyler made it to Nha Trang Air Base above Cam Rahn Bay to fly…”

“By the time Air Force Captain Bill Oyler made it to Nha Trang Air Base above Cam Rahn Bay to fly with the Ninetieth Operations Squadron, gay airmen in the States had filled his address book with the names of scores of other gay pilots stationed there. Between Nha Trang and the larger Tan Son Nhut base near Saigon, Oyler knew about one hundred gay pilots. When he transferred to Thailand, he met between 150 and 200 more gay Air Force personnel.”

Conduct Unbecoming: Gays & Lesbians in the U.S. Military by Randy Shilts, page 149.

Capt. Bill Oyler arrived in Vietnam in 1971.

See this quote for what life was like in the rear areas of Vietnam during the early years of the war.

“Don had survived the Tet offensive, but he did not survive the war. He died in combat on January 1,…”

“Don had survived the Tet offensive, but he did not survive the war. He died in combat on January 1, 1971, according to the records in Washington; and his name is inscribed on the twentieth slab of a long, low wall of polished black granite–Donald Dean Winn–one of the many gay men named on the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.”

Conduct Unbecoming: Gays & Lesbians in the U.S. Military by Randy Shilts, page 59.

See this post for an article of LGBT+ veterans visiting the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in 1993.   

From the source, Bob Coveney: “On the wall above my bed at Lane…

From the source, Bob Coveney: “On the wall above my bed at Lane Army Heliport. I still have both of these, the wings were from my time with the 203rd RAC while flying O-1G Birdogs. 1971″

From the source:Dustoffs, parked, and waiting.MedEvac…

From the source:

Dustoffs, parked, and waiting.

MedEvac helicopters, downhill from (former, apparently) 71st Evacuation Hospital in Pleiku, sometime in 1971. The 71st was a large hospital earlier in the war, but by the time I arrived in Nam it was a small operation and we signal folks lived in what had once been hospital wards. Since the place was still busy enough to support an air ambulance operation, these Hueys lived on the complex.

The red crosses painted on these birds weren’t magic shields. They’d land on the battle field, often while the battle raged, and face the dangers which had summoned them in the first place. Perhaps a mile from the hospital, a motor pool had become final home to the twisted and bullet-scarred hulk of a dustoff chopper whose crew had taken heavy fire during a rescue attempt.

Brave men. Dangerous work.

Camera: Minolta SR-T 101.

“SOUTH VIETNAM. Near Quang Tri, on the DMZ border. Patrol…

“SOUTH VIETNAM. Near Quang Tri, on the DMZ border. Patrol along the 17th parallel.” Photographed by Bruno Barbey, 1971.

This M113 APC has the name “One Chance Fancy” written on the turret shield. Unit unknown.