Category: 1968

M113 Armored Personnel Carriers of the 3rd Squadron, 4th Cavalry…

M113 Armored Personnel Carriers of the 3rd Squadron, 4th Cavalry Regiment, circa 1968-1969.

todaysdocument: “A Marine from CAP unit 281 brings a smile to…

todaysdocument:

“A Marine from CAP unit 281 brings a smile to the face of a small child of the village of Hoa Thanh, 8 miles Northeast of Da Nang.” 8/6/1968

File Unit: Divider/Subject – 374 – Vietnamese Civilian Life – 1968, 1962 – 1975Series: Black and White Photographs of Marine Corps Activities in Vietnam, 1962 – 1975Record Group 127: Records of the U.S. Marine Corps, 1775 – .

Now at the @usnatarchives Museum:

Remembering Vietnam: Twelve Critical Episodes in the Vietnam War 

Learn about the origins, controversies, and legacy of the Vietnam War through twelve critical episodes.

Find more records, information, and resources on the Vietnam War from the @usnatarchives at the Vietnam War Research Portal.

The Marine CAP, or Combined Action Program, were joint force units consisting of a Marine rifleman squad and a platoon of Regional or Popular Forces (essentially Vietnamese militia, poorly equipped). The idea was that the Marines would help the RF/PF platoon to patrol the area around a specific village or villages. The Marines would train them, and the RF/PF would benefit from the firepower that their American allies could call in. Meanwhile the Marines were living with the villagers, helping them with local projects, providing medical aid, etc. In many instances the Marines would send home asking for toys or clothes for the children and their families helped to raise money and send any requested items. 

If truly successful, the Marines would basically work themselves out of a job in that area. The RF/PFs would be able to defend the area themselves and there would be much less chance, if any at all, of Communist infiltration into the villages.

Australian soldier of 104 Signal Sq. doing paperwork, 1968.

Australian soldier of 104 Signal Sq. doing paperwork, 1968.

1st Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment soldiers resting, circa…

1st Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment soldiers resting, circa 1968-1969.

From the source: “A Viet Cong suspect, captured during an attack…

From the source: “A Viet Cong suspect, captured during an attack on an American outpost near the Cambodian border in South Vietnam, is interrogated.” (1968)

35th Inf. Reg. filling sandbags, 1968

35th Inf. Reg. filling sandbags, 1968

How the Fourth of July Was Celebrated (and Protested) in 1968

How the Fourth of July Was Celebrated (and Protested) in 1968:

By July 4, 1968, America was exposed to the brutal reality of Vietnam’s Tet Offensive and My Lai Massacre. Martin Luther King and Robert Kennedy were assassinated; riots broke out across the country. Young Americans snubbed tradition and authority. Despite the gains made earlier in the decade in the Civil Rights Movement, racial unrest bubbled in urban centers. For many Americans, this Fourth of July wasn’t marked by Sousa marches and patriotism, but rather a skeptical view of the government’s actions, domestically and abroad, let alone of traditional American values and celebrations. The air simmered with escalating violence, impatient protestors, hardened social classes and new social movements.

US Army Bell UH-1 Huey of the 61st Assault Helicopter Company,…

US Army Bell UH-1 Huey of the 61st Assault Helicopter Company, circa 1968.

From the source: Grethe Cammermeyer joined the army as a nurse…

From the source:

Grethe Cammermeyer joined the army as a nurse in 1961 and served in Vietnam 1967-1968. When she came out publicly as a lesbian in 1989 after nearly three decades in the army and army reserves, she was kicked out. After successfully suing the military, she returned to the reserves and retired as a Colonel in 1997. (Photo courtesy of Grethe Cammermeyer.)

Margarethe Cammermeyer was born in Oslo, Norway in 1942 under Nazi occupation. Her parents were part of the Norwegian underground. The family immigrated to the United States in 1951. 

Her service in Vietnam was with the 24th Evacuation Hospital at Long Binh as head nurse of a medical unit for fourteen months. She then served eight months as head nurse of a neurological intensive care unit.

Cammermeyer came to the realization that she was a lesbian some time after divorcing her husband of fifteen years. During an interview to receive top security clearance, she told interviewers that she was a lesbian. This resulted in her discharge. As stated above, she successfully sued the military and was reinstated into the National Guard.

Read more in her memoir: Serving in Silence by Margarethe Cammermeyer with Chris Fisher

Serving in Silence was made into a television movie starring Glenn Close.

See more at Grethe Cammermeyer’s website: https://www.cammermeyer.com.

From the source: “HMAS Stuart ‘F21′ did escort duties from…

From the source:
“HMAS Stuart ‘F21′ did escort duties from Singapore to  Vietnam for ‘The Vung Tau Ferry’.  Photo supplied by Keith Oliver [Jan 1968]”

See: HMAS Stuart (II), Royal Australian Navy