Category: 1965

Always post this on the Marine Corps Birthday :) My dad in the…

Always post this on the Marine Corps Birthday 🙂 My dad in the Corps working dogs.

They were the first dog platoon to arrive in Vietnam. This was also the fist time dogs had been used since WW2. Here he is near Danang, Sept 1965, 3rd Marine Div, 1st Provisional Dog Platoon.

Caption from usmc.mil site:

3rdMarDiv
Vietnam
STOP HIM- -Cpl Herman J. Herden (San Antonio, TX) commands his sentry dog “Rex” to the attack as Air Force TSgt William Sorrells plays the “enemy” in a practice session at the 1st Marine Provisional Dog Platoon site near Danang.

This was in Leatherneck Magazine also.

Submitted by the child of a veteran.

USMC M50 Ontos, 1965

USMC M50 Ontos, 1965

US Marines come ashore at Da Nang, March 1965.

US Marines come ashore at Da Nang, March 1965.

Convoy leaving Qui Nhon, 6th Battalion, 14th Artillery, 1965.

Convoy leaving Qui Nhon, 6th Battalion, 14th Artillery, 1965.

nyprarchives: This tape box by Burgess promises MAXIMUM OUTPUT…

nyprarchives:

This tape box by Burgess promises MAXIMUM OUTPUT and PLEASURE. 

This 1965 recording is one of several unofficial hearings on the Vietnam War, hosted by Representative William F. Ryan at the Carnegie Endowment International Center. The speakers discuss personal experiences touring Vietnam and recommendations for mediation of the war. Listen @wnyc!

From the source: Looking toward Van Tuang village hamlet and…

From the source:

Looking toward Van Tuang village hamlet and including air strikes during Operation [Starlite], held in the Chu Lai area approximately 65 miles south of the Danang Air Base.

Photographed 18 August 1965.

Read more about the operation here: Operation Starlite.

Floating restaurant in Saigon, circa 1965.

Floating restaurant in Saigon, circa 1965.

Bell UH-1 Hueys of the 281st Assault Helicopter Company, which…

Bell UH-1 Hueys of the 281st Assault Helicopter Company, which was the “first US Army Helicopter Company organized and trained as a Special Operations Aviation unit in the Republic of Vietnam.” (Source

“The reparations system provided the main frame for commerce with South Vietnam. Between the end of…”

“The reparations system provided the main frame for commerce with South Vietnam. Between the end of World War II and the early 1970s, Japan was relatively uninterested in acquiring resources from the south but very eager to open new markets there. In 1961, the peak year before the Vietnam War escalated, Japan sold goods worth $65.7 million to South Vietnam (and bought products valued at just $2.8 million). The Japanese also joined the Mekong River project, founded in 1957 by the Economic Commission for Asia and the Far East under the direction of the United Nations, to build dams, generate electricity, and control irrigation. By 1967 Japan was the third largest contributor. In 1964 Japan began building sugar mills in South Vietnam capable of giving the glutted world market an additional 150 tons per day, but all such Japanese projects and investments soon ran head-on into the chaos of warfare. By 1963 Japan’s exports to South Vietnam were barely half their level two years earlier; some of the dams and many of the factories started by the Japanese are still unbuilt.”

Fire Across the Sea: The Vietnam War and Japan 1965-1975 by Thomas RH Havens, published 1987. Quote on page 18.

Following WWII, France insisted upon reparations from Japan to be paid to the government in Saigon. The amount settled upon equaled $55.6 million, and was paid in full by 11 January 1965.

84th Engineer Battalion, US Army, constructing a road, 1965.

84th Engineer Battalion, US Army, constructing a road, 1965.