“Clearly, [Perry] Watkins was stuck in the Army, and he would have to figure out his own way to cope,…”

“Clearly, [Perry] Watkins was stuck in the Army, and he would have to figure out his own way to cope, because he believed the Army would not help him one bit. A few days later, Perry asked his field officer to spread a simple message: If anybody ever tried to rape him again, he would not fight, he would take it. Sometime, whoever messed with him would have to go to sleep; when he did, Perry would rearrange his head with a bunk adapter–one of the steel rods that held barracks beds in place. The threat seemed to work.”

Conduct Unbecoming: Gays & Lesbians in the U.S. Military by Randy Shilts, page 83. 

In 1968, five fellow soldiers attacked Perry Watkins, a gay black soldier, with the intent of raping him. Watkins fought them off. Afterwards he went to his supervisor demanding once again that he be released from the Army because of his sexuality, which had now made him a target. An investigation began of Watkins then, and the Criminal Investigation Division (CID) eventually decided that there was not enough evidence to support Watkins’ claim that he was gay.

For more about Perry Watkins, see these posts: [1], [2]